What's New?

If you have any questions, ideas or additions for the Scrapie program up to now or for the coming future please contact the Scrapie program co—ordinator. The Scrapie committee meets annually or upon any specific requests.

April 2007 Scrapie Canada Update

Sheep can now be imported from the United States

Canadian Food Inspection Agency News Release- April 20, 2007

Import of Small Ruminants from the United States: CFIA Policy- Apr. 20, 2007

Requirements for Small Ruminants Imported from the United States for Breeding, Domestic or Captive Purposes

Small Ruminants: are defined as members of the Family: Bovidae, Subfamily: Caprinidae, Genus : Ovis and Capra. In general, the term “small ruminants” applies to sheep and goats and their exotic relatives of the genus ovis and capra.

A. General Import Notes

  1. An import permit is required for any category of small ruminant and must be issued prior to the arrival of animals at a port of entry.
  2. Individual identification traceable to flock or herd of origin is required for all small ruminants to be imported.
  3. The importation of male small ruminants requires only general certification and applicable tests.
  4. Female small ruminants for breeding, domestic or captive purposes can only be imported from a premises enrolled in a Scrapie certification program and determined to be from a “negligible risk premises”;

OR

are being imported to a premises enrolled in a Scrapie certification program in Canada from a premises enrolled in a Scrapie certification program in the United States of equivalent or higher status. (See certification requirements for breeding females, Section D)

Information on the status of the exporting premises in the United States and the importing premises in Canada must be submitted when applying for an Import Permit.

  1. Female animals imported for temporary entry (stay of less than 30 days) that cannot meet the import requirements for breeding animals may be imported if they are certified by ultrasound examination not be pregnant at the time of entry to Canada. * When applying for an Import Permit the applicant must submit to the CFIA proof of authorization from the USDA to re-enter the United States.

B. Test Requirements Sheep (Ovis). No test requirements

Goats (Capra)

  1. Brucellosis (B. Abortus)The brucellosis test for the import of goats to Canada is the standard tube test (STT), or standard plate test (SPT) with negative reading at a 1:50 dilution and conducted within 30 days of importation. The results of the brucellosis test must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported.
  2. Tuberculosis The tuberculosis test is the standard caudal fold injection of tuberculin with a reading of results at 72 hours as “No Reaction” and conducted within 60 days of importation. The results of the tuberculin test must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported.

C. General Certification Requirements - Zoosanitary Certificate for US Origin Small Ruminants

Currently the Zoosanitary certificate referred to above is the: VS Form 17-140, United States Origin Health Certific

  1. Small ruminants may be imported into Canada from the United States if the animal is accompanied by a certificate of an official veterinarian of the United States or a certificate of a veterinarian authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and endorsed by an official veterinarian of the United States that clearly identifies the animal and shows that:
    • the small ruminant and its flock or herd of origin was inspected by a veterinarian within 30 days preceding the date of importation and were found to be free from communicable disease.
    • the animal was, to the best of the knowledge and belief of a veterinarian, not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of the inspection.
Two Sheep

Scrapie Information & Facts

CFIA LOCATIONS

CFIA NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS

59 Camelot Drive
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0Y9
PHONE: (613) 225-2342 / 1-800-442-2342
Fax: (613) 228-6601

 

ATLANTIC HEADQUARTERS

1081 Main St, PO Box 6088
Moncton, New Brunswick, E1C 8R2
PHONE: (506) 851-7400
Fax: Fax: (506) 851-2689

 

ONTARIO HEADQUARTERS

174 Stone Rd W
Guelph, Ontario, N1G 4S9
PHONE: (519) 837-9400
Fax: (519) 837-9766

 

QUEBEC HEADQUARTERS

Room 746-C - 2001 University St,
Montreal, Quebec, H3A 3N2
PHONE: (514) 283-8888
Fax: (514) 283-3143

 

WESTERN HEADQUARTERS

Room 654 - 220 4th Ave SE
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 4X3
PHONE: (403) 292-4301
Fax: (403) 292-5707

 

Project Partners

  1. The feeding to small ruminants of meat and bone meal or greaves of ruminant origin has been banned since 1997 and the prohibition is strictly enforced.
  2. The small ruminant is identified by a permanent identification system enabling it to be traced back to its flock or herd of origin.
  3. The small ruminant has in its right ear or, if there is insufficient ear, in the inner right flank or tail web, a legible, permanent tattoo that shows the letters USA, at least one centimeter in height.
  4. The animals on this certificate are covered by CFIA Import Permit #

D. Additional Certification for Females—Females must be certified as originating from:

A “Negligible Risk Premises”:

Defined as a premises which has maintained the flock or herd of origin and has complied with the following conditions for at least 5 years.

  1. the small ruminants have been permanently identified and records maintained, to enable trace back to their premises of birth.
  2. records of movements of small ruminants in and out of the premises are documented and maintained.
  3. introductions of females and embryos are allowed only from premises of an equal or higher stage in the process of accreditation / recognition.
  4. a veterinarian authorized by the Veterinary Administration inspects the small ruminants on the premises and audits the records at least once a year.
  5. the premises is not currently subject to any Scrapie control or eradication action and does not contain high risk animals as defined by the scrapie program.
  6. small ruminants on the premises have no direct contact with female small ruminants from premises of a lower status.
  7. all small ruminants over 18 months of age on the premises that have died or been killed for reasons other than routine slaughter have had samples collected and sent to a laboratory for Scrapie examination and for all other known Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) strains. Sampling must include all “fallen” stock and animals sent for emergency slaughter.

OR

E. A Premises Enrolled in a Scrapie Certification Program

Defined as a premises that has maintained a flock or herd which is complying with the following conditions, but for less than 5 years. Number of years of compliance to be stated.

  1. all small ruminants have been permanently identified and records maintained, to enable trace back to their premises of birth.
  2. records of movements of small ruminants in and out of the premises are documented and maintained.
  3. introductions of females and embryos are allowed only from premises of an equal or higher stage in the process of accreditation / recognition.
  4. a veterinarian authorized by the Veterinary Administration inspects the small ruminants on the premises and audits the records at least once a year.
  5. the premises is not currently subject to any Scrapie control or eradication action and does not contain high risk animals as defined by the Scrapie program.
  6. small ruminants on the premises have no direct contact with female small ruminants from premises of a lower status.
  7. all small ruminants over 18 months of age on the premises that have died or been killed for reasons other than routine slaughter have had samples collected and sent to a laboratory for Scrapie examination and for all other known Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) strains. Sampling must include all “fallen” stock and animals sent for emergency slaughter.

    * Flocks enrolled in the current US “Scrapie Flock Certification Program” do not meet the “Negligible Risk Premises” definition and may not fully meet the requirements for number (7) at the present time. Until changes to the US program are in place the import of female animals may occur but the status of importing premises will move to the lowest level of the Canadian Scrapie Flock Certification Program (Level E).

F. Permanent Identification System Defined as:

  1. An official USDA ear tag.

OR

  1. A tamper-resistant ear tag approved by USDA - Animal Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) for use in the Scrapie Flock Certification Program.

OR

  1. A unique alpha numeric ear tattoo; in the case of goats with insufficient ear space the tattoo may appear in the flank or tail web.

OR

  1. Electronic identification provided that a reader satisfactory to determine the elements accompanies the animal into Canada.

AND

For small ruminants which are required by Section 189 of the Health of Animals Regulations to have a tag applied under the national livestock identification program for imported animals, the importer must report the tag information to the administrator of the program as required and within the time period specified, and as well, to the CFIA location where the importation of the animal occurred if the tag is not already present in the animal at the time of import.

G. Additional Requirements

Animals imported into a scrapie monitored flock may only move to another scrapie monitored flock of equivalent or lower status or direct to slaughter. A license for removal must be obtained from the CFIA District Office responsible for the flock or herd. Restrictions on movement apply only until the flock or herd importing animals has met the Canadian definition of a “negligible risk premises”.

The movement of the offspring of an imported animal is not restricted. However the movement of the offspring of caprine animals must be reported to the CFIA office of responsibility for the herd until such time as a national identification program becomes mandatory.

H. Exemptions

An exemption from these requirements for non-domestic small ruminants will be considered on a case-by-case basis considering the intended use for animals imported is for medical use, scientific research or zoological collections.

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